Elk: Habitat and hunters

How will the bark beetle outbreak affect wildlife in our forests? Biologists are just starting to understand how wildlife species alter their behavior as forests die and how they use beetle-killed stands. Elk are of particular interest to many people in Colorado and Wyoming. Wyoming Game and Fish Department biologist Tony Mong is managing a long-term study to learn how elk will move differently through forests as trees die, and how hunters will change their movements as well. The goal is to ensure continuing hunting opportunities into the future.


 

Nearly all 2.9 million acres of the Medicine Bow and Routt National Forests and Thunder Basin National Grassland are open to public hunting.

 

 

Credits

Videography and production

Morgan Heim

Featuring

Tony Mong, Biologist, Wyoming Game and Fish Department

Aaron Voos, Public Affairs Specialist, Medicine Bow-Routt National Forests and Thunder Basin National Grassland, U.S. Forest Service

Hunters

Chanse Simmons
Clayton James Proctor
Powder Tarrell
William Lloyd
Christopher Zachary Towns
Henry L. Arnold, Jr.
Oliver W. Lloyd

Additional footage courtesy Lindsay Simpson, Wyoming Game and Fish Department

Music

“Forward,” Matthew Kidd
“Love in Vain,” Zachary Cale, Mighty Moon, and Ethan Schmid
“Hiding Place,” Holley Maher
“Vector Melody,” Poddington Bear

Coordinated by

U.S Forest Service Medicine Bow-Routt National Forests and Thunder Basin National Grassland

U.S Forest Service Medicine Bow-Routt National Forests and Thunder Basin National Grassland

University of Wyoming Ruckelshaus Institute of Environment and Natural Resources

University of Wyoming Ruckelshaus Institute of Environment and Natural Resources

© 2014