Fire: Old growth, new growth

In the summer of 2012 the Arapaho Fire torched more than 98,000 acres on and around Laramie Peak in southeast Wyoming including parts of the Medicine Bow and Routt National Forests. Did bark beetles make this fire more intense than it might have otherwise been? What caused such a major blaze? A fire lookout, a University of Wyoming botanist, and a U.S. Forest Service hydrologist and fire management officer explore these questions and try to untangle the relationship between hot, dry forests, beetles, and wildfire. And they try to predict forest responses to huge disturbances.


 

Even in the most severely burned areas of the Arapaho Fire, new plants began to sprout that fall and the following summer.

 

 

Credits

Videography and production

Morgan Heim

Featuring

Kathy Fraser, Black Mountain Fire Lookout, Medicine Bow National Forest

Dan Tinker, Professor, Botany Department, University of Wyoming

Clay Westbrook, Fire Management Officer, Douglas District, Medicine Bow-Routt National Forests & Thunder Basin National Grassland, U.S. Forest Service

Dave Gloss, North Zone Hydrologist, Medicine Bow-Routt National Forests & Thunder Basin National Grassland, U.S. Forest Service

Music

“A Suicide,” Candlegravity
“What True Self Feels Bogus Let’s Watch Jason,” Chris Zabriskie
“Going To,” Jahzzar

Coordinated by

U.S Forest Service Medicine Bow-Routt National Forests and Thunder Basin National Grassland

U.S Forest Service Medicine Bow-Routt National Forests and Thunder Basin National Grassland

University of Wyoming Ruckelshaus Institute of Environment and Natural Resources

University of Wyoming Ruckelshaus Institute of Environment and Natural Resources

© 2014