Mountain Pine Beetle: Little bug, big reach

This tiny beetle, no bigger than a rice grain, has exploded in numbers and swept through our western forests, killing trees and altering ecosystems. But have you ever taken the time to get to know this miniature inhabitant of our forests? Beetles are a native species, with a complex life cycle. They have been part of our forests for millennia.


 

Mountain pine beetles have killed most mature pines across nearly 100,000 square miles in western North America. Now, in parts of Colorado and Wyoming, they're running out of suitable trees.

 

 

Credits

Animation, videography, and production

Morgan Heim

Script

Emilene Ostlind and Aaron Voos

Narration

Emilene Ostlind

Aerial footage

Dave Steinke, Public Affairs Specialist, Rocky Mountain Region, U.S. Forest Service

Still photography

Morgan Heim and Joe Riis/U.S. Forest Service

Music

“Tki with Les Gauchers Orchestra,” Lee Maddeford
“Sonata No. 1 in F Minor Op. 2 No. 1,” Daniel Veesey
“Baio Lo-Fi,” Chico Correa and Electronic Band

Coordinated by

U.S Forest Service Medicine Bow-Routt National Forests and Thunder Basin National Grassland

U.S Forest Service Medicine Bow-Routt National Forests and Thunder Basin National Grassland

University of Wyoming Ruckelshaus Institute of Environment and Natural Resources

University of Wyoming Ruckelshaus Institute of Environment and Natural Resources

© 2014