Recreation: Climbers and campers

People who go into our national forests to enjoy many recreation activitiesfrom hunting and fishing to camping and climbinghave all been affected by bark beetles in one way or another. The Forest Service works to make sure recreation areas are safe and open to the public as much as possible. Sometimes this entails treatments like removing trees that threaten to blow down, or spraying trees to keep them from succumbing to beetle attacks. Meanwhile, people who have visited their local forests for years are learning to see their favorite places in new ways.


 

In a given year the Medicine Bow and Routt National Forests receive 2.7 million recreation visits to over 300 developed sites.

Significant work has been done and will continue to ensure those sites are open and safe for visitors.

 

 

Credits

Videography and production

Morgan Heim

Featuring

Sara Alberts, Forester, Laramie Ranger District, U.S. Forest Service

Alyssa Wechsler, climber and resident of Laramie, Wyoming

Music

“Murmur,” Broke for Free
“Phase IV,” Lo Fi Is Si Fi

Coordinated by

U.S Forest Service Medicine Bow-Routt National Forests and Thunder Basin National Grassland

U.S Forest Service Medicine Bow-Routt National Forests and Thunder Basin National Grassland

University of Wyoming Ruckelshaus Institute of Environment and Natural Resources

University of Wyoming Ruckelshaus Institute of Environment and Natural Resources

© 2014