Timber: New life for a beetle-killed tree

When a tree dies from bark beetle attack, it's not the end of the story. The trees carry a distinctive blue stain in their wood, which some woodworkers and carpenters find beautiful. Beetle-killed wood can be used to make all kinds of useful products including posts and poles, lumber for construction, floors and siding, and furniture. Follow a tree from harvest to its new life as a table in a local cafe.


 

The Medicine Bow and Routt National Forests offer about 8,400 log truck loads of timber each year for multiple uses.

Beetle-killed trees that are harvested go to seven mills, two pellet factories, two post and pole factories, and numerous smaller operations.

 

 

Credits

Videography and production

Morgan Heim

Featuring

Sawdust Ranch Woodworks, Grant McWilliams

Blue-stain tables in Sweet Melissa Cafe, Laramie, Wyoming

Music

“It was good,” Les Enfants

Coordinated by

U.S Forest Service Medicine Bow-Routt National Forests and Thunder Basin National Grassland

U.S Forest Service Medicine Bow-Routt National Forests and Thunder Basin National Grassland

University of Wyoming Ruckelshaus Institute of Environment and Natural Resources

University of Wyoming Ruckelshaus Institute of Environment and Natural Resources

© 2014