Volunteers: You can help the recovery

As trees die from bark beetles in campgrounds and along trails and other recreation areas in our national forests, managers face a monumental task to keep those areas safe and accessible. Fortunately, the Medicine Bow and Routt National Forests have strong partnerships with many groups that organize volunteers who do significant labor. Volunteers are vital to Forest Service management.


 

During an average year 500 volunteers work 22,000 hours on the Medicine Bow and Routt National Forests and Thunder Basin National Grassland.

These efforts are worth an estimated $500,000.

 

 

Credits

Videography and production

Morgan Heim

Featuring

Kent Foster, Natural Resource Specialist/Recreation Supervisor, Hahns Peak-Bears Ears District, Routt National Forest, U.S. Forest Service

Jess Feinerman, Domestic Sales/Volunteer Coordinator, SmartWool, LLC

Volunteers from SmartWool work day at Hahns Peak Lake Campground, Colorado, June 20, 2013

Additional footage

Aaron Voos, Public Affairs Specialist, Medicine Bow-Routt National Forests and Thunder Basin National Grassland, U.S. Forest Service

Music

“Plantation,” Jason Shaw
“Something Elated,” Broke for Free
“The Great Cape,” Kid Flicks

Coordinated by

U.S Forest Service Medicine Bow-Routt National Forests and Thunder Basin National Grassland

U.S Forest Service Medicine Bow-Routt National Forests and Thunder Basin National Grassland

University of Wyoming Ruckelshaus Institute of Environment and Natural Resources

University of Wyoming Ruckelshaus Institute of Environment and Natural Resources

© 2014