Watershed: Guardian of the city faucets

Even people who live far from national forests and may never visit a forest can be affected by the bark beetle outbreak. Take, for example, the relationship between Cheyenne, Wyoming, and the Medicine Bow and Routt National Forests. Most of Cheyenne's drinking water travels in pipelines from Rob Roy Reservoir 75 miles around Sheep Mountain and over the Laramie Range to reservoirs and the water treatment plant near Cheyenne. Water managers are on the alert, testing water and watching for changes as trees die from beetle attacks. Along with the Forest Service, they are making sure Cheyenne's citizens continue to find clean, clear water flowing from their taps.


 

The Cheyenne Board of Public Utilities has operated on the Medicine Bow National Forest since 1962.

That partnership was recently renewed for another 30 years.

 

 

Credits

Videography and production

Morgan Heim

Featuring

Clint Bassett, Water Conservation and Public Relations Specialist, City of Cheyenne Board of Public Utilities

Ron Kailey, Water Quality Control Supervisor, City of Cheyenne Board of Public Utilities

Music

“Acceptance,” Welcome Wizzard
“Dry Air,” Podington Bear
“Bed,” Jahzzar

Coordinated by

U.S Forest Service Medicine Bow-Routt National Forests and Thunder Basin National Grassland

U.S Forest Service Medicine Bow-Routt National Forests and Thunder Basin National Grassland

University of Wyoming Ruckelshaus Institute of Environment and Natural Resources

University of Wyoming Ruckelshaus Institute of Environment and Natural Resources

© 2014